How to Stop Expecting The Worst

how to not expect the worst

A new situation has just arisen for you, and you are worried about the outcome.  Do you immediately assume that the worst will happen?

If so, you are not alone. In our modern Western society, survival fears run rampant. It would be a normal response to fear an unknown outcome since you are programmed—through advertisements, news and entertainment—that your very life might end if you are not vigilant of all inherent dangers.

But if you look back in your life, I can say with 100% accuracy, that there was a time that you expected the worst to happen, and it didn’t.  In fact, it’s likely that something unexpectedly awesome happened instead.

Let’s do a quick test of your beliefs about this concept:

 

Think about a time when you worried about something that never happened.

When you expected the worst. When you stayed up at night in an anxious fit because you weren’t sure if you would make it through.  When you truly worried if you would be out on the street living in a cardboard box under a bridge.

 

Now we’ll divide that scenario into two parts:  What you expected to happen, and what actually happened.

 

Bring yourself to the beginning of the situation, when everything was up in the air and things were chaotic.

What does that feel like to you? Pay attention to your senses and feel that scenario once again.

If you are new to recognizing your feelings, here are some examples:

  • Your mind gets very sharp, as if on alert. (Fear)
  • You hold your breath. (Ready to run)
  • Involuntary shaking (Dread)

Chances are, your body cramped up, your breath was choppy, and you felt like you wanted to bolt. These are indications of the beliefs you held about how things work out for you. While you were contemplating the outcome of your situation, your beliefs directed your reactions.  

That feeling indicates your belief at the time you registered that memory.

 

Now let’s look at the other part:

The worst didn’t happen. 

Now what does that feel like to you?

If you are new to recognizing your feelings, here are some examples:

  • Your muscles relax. (Relief)
  • Your gut feels like it’s been washed over with warm water.  (Calmness)
  • You take a deep breath. (Alignment with your Source)

If your feelings changed between “expecting the worst” and “the worst didn’t happen,” then that situation arose to give you the opportunity to change your beliefs.

 

Now whether or not you chose the new belief at that time and place, only you know.  If you didn’t, then you are not alone.

You can use that past scenario to change your beliefs NOW.

Next time a situation arises in which you automatically jump to expecting the worst, reach for the feeling you felt last time when the worst didn’t happen.

Grab for that better feeling, and then move your mind along on its way to a fun subject.  Each time you perform this switch, you solidify the new belief and decommission the old one.

Hopefully, you recognize that you have all of the building blocks for a positive life, right there for use.  It’s merely a matter of choosing a building block that supports your desires, rather than those that no longer support you.

Love to you.

 

Kimberly

author: Kimberly

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